After crunching the (750) vertical stabilizer, bending the rudder, and replacing same, I started wondering whether anyone else shares my situation of having a hangar door too low for the tail.

I have rigged up a wood ramp that I put outside for the nosewheel to ride up on, thus lowering the tail; this works fine, but I'd rather have a tow bar that raises the nose without paying through the nose. Any ideas?

Even a better, stronger tow bar would be nice as the one with the notches for the tiny attachment points on the gear shaft is a tad too light for the job and pops off easily. I'd like to turn it easier too--bad knee and all that . . .

Lacking that, I may have to fabricate a ramp out of aluminum that has ramps on both ends with enough level surface to keep the tail down long enough to clear the hangar opening.

Much obliged,

Wayne

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If you are on a hard, smooth surface, what about a modified floor or pallet jack for a tow bar?

Jon, I wish I was, but I need something with bigger wheels to handle the hangar door tracks and the rough tarmac.

Thanks for helping.

Wayne

Wayne,

I was just 'thinking out loud'. In the end, given your situation, I really was not any help! How high do you need to lift your nose wheel to drop the tail the required amount?

Jon

 

I did the same thing but not as bad...the leading edge was crunched but i mashed it out (sort of) by hand and am still running it. I knew it would eventually happen. I've had ramps like you talk about and that worked ok but am always changing plane positions in the hangar now so have abandoned that. I just pull the tail down by hand and push it under the door. I've got a homemade towbar that works ok for all but under the door. Mine is a 701...the 750 might not be as easy to pull down.

I'm ok with what I got now if I don't forget to pull the tail down again.

I hear you. I did the same thing, but being a bit of a gimp, I feared I might slip and fall at the wrong time--so as long as can keep the nose gear on the ramp, I should be ok. I just need to build a lighter ramp or design a tow dolly that will hold the nose wheel securely and move over the rough spots. My gimpiness is an issue too, with this old tow bar.

WT

Jon, I appreciate your input very much. I need to lift the nosewheel 3 or 4 inches. 4 to be safe. Unless I move to an even lower opening--I was in one before I moved to this one.

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