What kind of baggage tie-down arrangements do y'all use? I have a 750, but info from other planes should be applicable.

I'm thinking of using stainless steel D-rings, which cost $40-some bucks each from AC Spruce, $70-some from my local marine supplier.

How and where to attach the attachment hardware is also an issue. My ELT is in the back corner on the pilot's (left) side.

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In my 701 and the 750 my buddy and I just finished we made some tri-angular 063 aluminum brackets with a hole drilled in them to function as a "D" ring.  One edge of the bracket is attached to a structural rivet line with five or six A5 rivets but you could use AN-3 bolts if you wanted.  The aluminum tabs behind the seats are bent up at about a 45 degree angle to allow access for the tie down hole for a bungee hook.  We put four of these tab in, two at the back of the seats and two at the forward edge of the step up over the flapperon cross tube so that they hang over the lower baggage bays.

Is this tiedown setup going to restrain a 100 lb cooler at 9G in an accident?  Probably not.  The problem with the 750 baggage bay is there isn't great access to heavy structure with which to attach super duty baggage tiedowns.  I suppose you could use stainless tiedown rings and put in heavy doublers under the thin structure but that starts to add some serious weight.  You would need to decide how much baggage security you need based on what you expect to carry in the baggage bay and how much risk you are willing to take. 

I'm no engineer so you might want to discuss any design you come up with with Caleb at Zenith to make sure you are not doing anything dangerous.

Hope this info has been helpful.

Doug M

Thanks for your response, Doug.

The biggest danger I'm concerned about is <41 pounds of anything unsecured flopping or flying around the cockpit in turbulence. I don't trust bungees, and plan to use ropes that will double as tiedowns, threaded through fishnet over a lightweight sleeping bag or two, under which other gear will be stowed, possibly each with their own short tether. Some doubling will be required, but I will be "satisfied" with some restraint of loose material rather than none at all. Am I to understand (judging by the absence of other comments) that there are any pilots out there who are comfortable with unsecured items in the baggage bay? Or, for that matter, anywhere in the cockpit/cabin?

I'm not satisfied with any of the hardware I've found in Marine or RV stores' catalogs. I paid over 40 bucks for one stainless set that were just a joke, and I ordered another set yesterday that I'm already dissatisfied with, prompted by Doug's comments. This may require some kind of custom design to maximize performance for this application.

Thanks for the suggestion, Doug, that I contact the Zenith folks--I'm waiting for a response to another question, then I will hit them with this one. I'm going to visit the factory in May, so I may ask them then. But I'm still interested in comments on this issue.

My 701 was from CZAW and has the extended baggage area. I had planned to fit a cargo net across the area between the control rods housing, but have not found a suitable set so far. What I did do was fit some MS21919 DG clamps to these housings and string across 2 sets of bungee tape style cords. This at least stops things moving about in the area and keeps the lighter items like clothing and sleeping bags confined to the aft section. I dont like to stow anything else up there.

Originally the 701 only had a hat shelf behind the seats, its been extended twice and thats the reason its become less safe - more care required when loading up. I wonder if fitting a fence of large hole mesh such as used for home security window protection across the control rods housing would be a solution. This avoids drilling and attaching to load carrying structural areas.

Ralph

I'm too much of a (non-) builder greenhorn to know what MS21919 clamps are . . .

How many clamps and how did you attach them? Did you use doublers?

I have a 750; don't know how different the configuration is, but finding strong enough anchor points in the right place is a bit of a "challenge."

Wayne

The clamp are the metal loops usually lined with rubber and commonly called Adel clamps.

At one time there was a limit on the baggage area of 40 lbs. However I cannot find the limit specified anywhere now. But you probably should not be carrying anything very heavy back there because the structure is not that strong. So SS marine hold downs might be a bit of overkill.

Jeff

I'm thinking of going with these tracks (http://www.uscargocontrol.com/Ratchet-Straps-Tie-Downs/Airline-Stra... ) in the baggage area so I can move the tiedown rings around. I'm thinking of attaching them with rivnuts to the sheet aluminum, wherever there is a double-thickness if possible. I'm no structural engineer, but I'm thinking that because there will be several bolts to hold them down they will resist pulling out under the loads a maximum of 40 pounds will exert. I plan to use some kind of doubling where I can access the backside of the sheet metal. I wonder if attaching a couple of rings to the seat structure would cause any problems. I'll appreciate any comments and suggestions.

Thanks,

WT

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